Posts Tagged ‘ media ’

Newest in New: What’s Next For Social Media?

As an advertising agency specializing in creating relationships and successful advertising through social media, we are often asked, “What’s next?” Well, in social media – sometimes it’s hard to tell. To find out, you must be truly tuned in, always searching for the newest tips and tricks.

Here are some of the newest in new to help fulfill your ever-growing social media addiction:

You Can Now Tag Fan Pages in Facebook Photos!
Throughout the years, it’s become common practice to tag people in pictures you upload to Facebook, but now Facebook gives you the ability to tag Fan Pages in photos as well. So, next time your company sponsors that local 5k, feel free to tag your Fan Page, not just your employees. It works the same way as when you tag people, meaning that once your Fan Page is tagged, the photo will appear on their Wall and in the Photos sections.

You Can Now Promote Products Without Even Realizing it!
Facebook has recently started a new form of advertising called Sponsored Stories that uses the power of influence to promote businesses. Whenever you actively engage on Facebook, by checking-in to a place, liking a page, posting on a page, sharing apps, using apps or playing games, Facebook could use this information to promote the product, person or service you are referring to. These stories are eligible to appear in your friends’ News Feed and now show up on the right hand column of your Home Page. When it comes to privacy, Facebook is all clear though, because only people who are eligible to see your News Feed story are eligible to see it as a Sponsored Story. So next time you say, “Gosh, that food was DELICIOUS at $%(*$#^” remember that you could be speaking to masses on behalf of that restaurant.
You Can Now Explore New Places Through Foursquare!
Foursquare has just released version 3.0 for Android and the iPhone. The new version of the popular check-in app offers some significant changes, most notably – the Explore menu. Once you open Foursquare on a mobile device, you will be given the option to “Explore.” Through this section of the application, Foursquare gives you intuitive recommendations on places you would like based on your friend’s check-ins and your own. For specific recommendations, you can choose from a variety of categories, sorted by Food, Coffee, Nightlife, Shops and A&E.

You Can Now Share Links Via Friends on Facebook!
Facebook has recently introduced the new “Share” button. When you see a friend with a cool link posted on their Wall, you will see the options to Like, Comment or Share. Clicking “Share” will post the link on your wall and give your friend credit – your post will say something like, “Jennifer Johnstone shared this link via Linda Embrey”. This feature is somewhat reminiscent of a re-tweet on Twitter.

You Can Now Explore Inventory Through Google Places:
There is a new Google Places update only available in the US that allows users to search the inventory of a specific place. Paul Lee, senior product manager at Google, explained this update as “a new feature that automatically brings your offline catalog to the web, letting customers view your products and search your local inventory on your Place Page before visiting your store.”  The feature will display five of your most popular products with their prices so that potential customers can browse for what they’re looking for online before coming to buy it from your offline store. Potential consumers can also search your stock if they’re looking for a specific item not listed in your five items.
Unfortunately, by the time you get around to reading this post, or even me finished writing it, it may be outdated. To stay abreast of the newest in new for social media, continue to research on a daily basis…or you could just call evok at 407.302.4416 or follow us on Twitter – @evoklarry.

Media Terms & Definitions

It is important for everyone in an agency to understand media terminology to improve communication both within the agency as well as with clients. This
is especially important for newcomers to the agency business or business owners who don’t deal with media everyday.

Here are some common media terms and definitions.

DEMOGRAPHIC: Specific groups within the universe that one is targeting, usually broken down by age and gender but could also include income, buying characteristic, lifestyle etc.

RATING: A percent of the population or universe exposed to an advertising medium.

RATING POINT: A value equal to one percent (one rating) of a population or universe.

GRP/TRP: The sum of all the ratings delivered by a given list of media properties. Specifically, they mean gross rating point and target rating point. They essentially mean the same thing.

IMPRESSION: This is the number of contacts (eyeballs) that are exposed to a message. It does include duplication and is usually expressed in thousands.

REACH: The percent of different people or households exposed to a specific media schedule within a given period of time, expressed as a percentage. It is unduplicated and can be used to refer to a single media property or a media schedule.

FREQUENCY: The average number of times a target audience or household is reached by a media schedule.

CPM: Cost per thousand. It is the cost to expose 1,000 people or households to your advertising.

CPP: Cost per point. It represents the cost of purchasing one rating point.

PRE-EMPTION: The substitution of one advertiser’s ad by another advertiser paying a higher rate for the same time and program.

MAKE-GOOD: Comparable unit or units of advertising offered when the original spot ordered either did not run or ran incorrectly.

NET COST: Advertising rates that do not include agency commission.

GROSS COST: Advertising rates that include agency commission.

SHARE: A percentage of the audience tuned to a particular program at a given time.

BILLBOARD: Typically, an outdoor advertising display unit. It also can be a :05 or :10 announcement indicating sponsorship of a program or feature such as traffic or news.

POSTER PANEL: A standard outdoor advertising display unit.

SHOWING: A group of outdoor boards, which provide certain percentage coverage of a market, usually purchased as #25 showing or #50 showing.

AVAILS: Availability – it is the unsold units of time available to
sell to advertisers. It can also be a station’s submission of programs, rates and ratings for planning and buying.

DAYPART: One of the time segments the day is divided by for broadcast media. It is determined by programming.

DRIVE TIME: Dayparts used in radio that have the highest amount of listeners in cars, usually while people are driving to and from work. It is generally from M-F 6a-10a and M-F 3p-7p.

ROS: Run of Schedule – where specific times and programs have not been requested by the advertiser.

DMA: Designated Market Area – Nielsen’s term for geographical areas made up of exclusive counties based on which home market stations receive the predominate share of viewing.

CIRCULATION: Total number of copies of a publication distributed at a specific time.

COLUMN INCH: A unit of newspaper space that is one column wide and one inch deep.

P4C: Abbreviation for page 4-color ad.

PBW: Abbreviation for page black & white ad.

DEC: Daily Effective Circulation – it is the average number of persons, in cars or other vehicles, passing and potentially exposed to an advertising display for either 12, 18 or 24 hours.

EOIs: Eyes On Impressions – the average number of persons who are likely to notice an ad on an out of home
display for either 12 hours (un-illuminated) or 18 hours (illuminated). Unless specified as In-Market, EOIs include all persons who notice the unit, regardless of the origin of their trips. EOIs are reported in weekly increments.

Although these definitions account for some of the everyday terms, we encourage you to continue your quest for media knowledge and know-how. Please see the following for more terms and definitions:

http://www.arbitron.com/radio_stations/tradeterms.htm http://www.nielsenmedia.com/glossary/index.htm http://www.oaaa.org/marketingresources/industrystandards/outdoorterms.aspx

What to Know About an Annual Media Buy

When attempting to take your media in-house or when offering media services for others, it’s important to know that media can be purchased in several ways, such as by flight, monthly, quarterly or annually. The trick to being a successful media planner and buyer is knowing which structure works best for you and your clients.

A flight can be from a short as one week to as long as several months. It is a continuous buy, which usually serves to bring attention to one specific promotion.

The structures for buying media on a monthly, quarterly, and/or annual basis are pretty simple – as they follow the standard definition of the time lapses listed above. Though you have to choose which structure is right for you, an annual buy, which is achieved by the media buyer placing the entire annual media plan at once, does have advantages over buying monthly, quarterly or by flight.

Listed below are the top 5 things you need to know about an annual media buy:
An annual buy will definitely give a buyer leverage to get the best rates, especially with television, cable and radio buys.
Due to the volume of the buy, the rates will be more negotiable and generally lower than if placed monthly, quarterly or by flight.
The closer the media buyer is to the beginning of the schedule when placing the buy, the higher the rates will likely be. If the media is sold out, the rates may need to be high enough to bump another advertiser’s spots.  At times, it may be so close to the flight that the station does not have any space available to sell. Neither of these situations is in the best interest of the client.
With print, if you know what you’ll be spending within the year, a media buyer can usually negotiate a contract to buy a certain number of column inches or spend a certain amount of money. This is harder to do if the buy is not purchased annually, as there can be short rates if the contract isn’t met. This isn’t good for either the agency or the client.
Annual buys can always be adjusted, moved and or canceled if necessary with sufficient notice to the media vendors, so you will not be locked into any media that isn’t working for you. Media can constantly be adjusted to give your clients the best outcome possible.

Annual buying is great for many clients, and with its adjustability, you’re really in a win-win situation. Not only do you get the best deals for being prepared and coming to your rep with a well-thought out plan, but you also get flexibility in order to meet your client’s needs.

With our ever-changing marketplace accelerating at such a rapid pace, new tools, trends and types of marketing are being introduced every day. Due to this fast-paced way of life, many believe that you should steer clear of annual buys – because you never know when something will change. Not true.

Annual buys can be bought in a way that is adjustable, allowing you to bump up or bump back spots, make changes to material, swap your :30 radio spot with a :60, etc. – you just have to know what you’re doing.

As we have seen lately in the marketplace, sometimes there are other situations with annual buys that need to be addressed, such as the programming change that moved American Idol from airing on Tuesdays and Wednesdays to airing Wednesdays and Thursdays. If you bought a good spot on Thursday during a popular show with a competing station – and now because of a programming change, you have to compete with American Idol – there would be a problem. This is when you contact your rep and discuss your options. By doing so, you’ll learn just how well your leveraged your annual buy in the first place.

Media planning and buying are complicated processes, so before beginning a plan, make sure to do your research on the different buy structures. If you need guidance, feel free to contact evok advertising at 407.302.4416.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Broadcast News Interviews

Having the news media interview you or someone from your company sounds like a dream come true, huh? What many people don’t realize though, is that interviews can make or break you. A single interview can determine how the public perceives you and your company. As we all know, perception is reality – so how about grounding yourself in reality – crossing your fingers and hoping for the best isn’t going to cut it.

But alas, there are training courses on how to give a good interview, literature available online and books that you can buy to help you out. Problem is, many interviews are unexpected and on the spot.

To you, we give our top 10 tips for interviewing on camera for edited broadcast news features, clips or segments. Take this whitepaper as an overview, an outline of what to do, how to act, and more importantly, how to say what needs to be said.

1.    Do Dress Accordingly – When attending any event or company gathering, where there will be news cameras, dress accordingly. No flashy colors, weird hairstyles, bulky jewelry or overdone makeup (like cat-eyes). Depending on where you are, you might need a full suit and tie. For many casual events, consider wearing a polo shirt with your company logo on the breast. Picture being on camera from the sternum up, but don’t discount the slacks!

2.    Do Think in Sound Bites – Wherever you are, you should be able to produce a short,
9-second sound bite for the camera. Include: Name, position & company, where you are, what is happening and how this is beneficial to the community and/or the company.
For example, “I’m Jennifer Johnstone, public relations manager of evok advertising. I’m out here with the Florida Tuskers football team today as they celebrate breast cancer awareness and honor 10 local survivors on the field.”

3.    Don’t Forget Key Points – I’ve seen it dozens of times – the person being interviewed gets in their sound bite and then stares blankly at the camera. As a true advocate of your company or organization, you should be able to produce a few key points that will keep the camera on you a little longer. The better the points, the better the coverage. Hopefully your cameraman will continue asking you questions to keep you on your feet, but don’t take the extra help for granted, it doesn’t always happen.

4.    Don’t Kill the News Values – Most broadcast news interviews are used and reused over a 24-48-hour cycle. That means you may be interviewed on a Thursday and not make your big TV appearance until Saturday. Even though these segments can be edited, try not to mention the date and time that you are being interviewed. This will kill the “timeliness” of the interview, and you don’t want to mess with the news values! Also, referring to the cameraman by name is not a good idea. Broadcast news segments will stick an anchor in front of you to introduce your interview. Say his name is Tom, and throughout the interview you are referring to Bill. It won’t sound right and the public will sense something is off.

5.    Do Play the Game of Bridge – If you are a person who stays in the moment, you may start to realize that the cameraman, or even the interviewer, is not asking the right questions. Bridges serve as a nice way to acknowledge what the reporter is saying, but to link the question back to your key points. After answering a question that is close to allowing you to reach the heart of the matter, but misses the mark, throw in a bridge.
Here are some examples:
•    “Great question, but the heart of the matter is…”
•    “I would say that … is more to the point.”
•    “Another thing to remember is…”
•    “Let me add that…”
•    “…but in addition…”

6.    Don’t Speak to Your Co-Worker – When you are giving an interview, remember that you are speaking to the masses. Don’t use jargon that only your co-worker would understand, and don’t over complicate simple things. Be wary of acronyms as well. One of our clients is NMEDA (National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association), but in an interview I would use the full name frequently. The rule about using the whole name first and only once, only works for print. What if the media edits out the one time you said the whole name? Chances are they will, especially if it’s true that once an interview goes on, the interviewee gets more comfortable and sounds more natural.

7.    Do Take Your Time – Rushed answers are the worst! They never will have the same effect as a well-thought out answer. When you are interviewing, remember to take pauses to think about things. Because of your adrenaline, a pause will feel like an eternity to you, but will really only be a few seconds in your interview. Also, long pauses can be edited out of the final piece. Another tactic I use when thinking of a great answer is repeating the question.
For example:
“And what strides have you made in the community thus far?”
“Well, our strides in the community have been numerous during our eight years in business. Most notably, our recent…”

8.    Don’t Play Goggly-Eyes – Before I even get into body language, let me first address the question I get most often – where do you look during your interview? There is a person, and there is a camera. What if the person is holding the camera? And the camera – what if it’s next to their face? ALWAYS stare at the person when they are holding the camera. Looking at the camera will make you nervous. If the person is holding the camera on their shoulder, it will create the illusion that you are looking at the camera. If there is a reporter on camera with you, keep your stage presence in mind. Talk to the reporter directly, but it’s okay to occasionally look at the cameraman as if they are involved in the conversation, like you would with an audience. Though you must make sure that you are not giving only half your body to the camera. Stay open.

9.    Don’t Smile Just to Smile – Everyone says to smile when you are on camera. But, be careful with this rule. I don’t want the President of So-And-So Financial Company smiling on camera as he tells me that their stocks have gone down and I’m out over 50%. I don’t want to see a giddy, smiling face make an announcement that their local mom and pop shop can no longer survive since the big guys moved in next door. I’m not saying you need to cry about it, but be sure to keep serious news, serious.

10.    Do Correct the Incorrect – While on camera, you may be presented with a question that contains an untrue fact. The goal of a good interviewer is to correct the misinformation before proceeding to answer the question.
For example: “With eight guerilla publicity stunts in only one year, does your agency believe that consumers will no longer find these stunts entertaining in 2011?” “Actually, we have produced 10 stunts this year, and as an agency we believe that as long as they stand out, and create enough hype in the marketplace to go viral, they will continue to be successful in maintaining public attention in 2011.

The Benefits of Utilizing a Newspaper Buying Network

Say you’ve got a client that puts out tons of newspaper ads, in tons of markets, like every time you blink they have a new ad, just ready to be sent out. As a media buyer and planner, it’s your job to figure out the best and most efficient way to make large media buys across all selected markets. With a busy, often changing schedule, how do you keep all the pricing straight, the market research on point, and get copies of all the tear sheets to show to your client?

By hoping and praying? Calling every ad sales team in the nation? We think not.

If you have a client for whom you purchase multiple newspapers in multiple markets, you many want to consider utilizing a newspaper-buying network to help. There are actually several, including the Newspaper National Network, the Florida Press Service and others, like Valassis.

Some media buyers and planners choose to deal with every paper individually, and this is fine, as it is part of maintaining relationships and is ideal for particular clients. But, if you have either a huge multi-market client and/or a modest media buying department, the services that these buying groups provide can be invaluable.

Benefits of newspaper buying services:

  1. Saving time – and we all know time is money.  With a newspaper buying service, a media buyer/planner only has one point of contact instead of a contact at every newspaper. They now have more time to spend on the strategy of the media plan…or with other clients, for shame.
  2. Coordination of the details – These services not only will research and negotiate media, but will also provide circulation numbers, mechanical specs and space and material close dates.
  3. Accounting savings – There is typically only one insertion order and therefore only one vendor invoice, saving time in accounting. And, in the end, there’s only one check to mail out.
  4. Proof of performance – The newspaper buying service also tracks all the proof of performance so no more tracking down tear sheets or going at a six-foot pile of newspapers with scissors and a dream.
  5. One point of contact – With a buying service, it’s easy to make last minute changes to the buys/plans. Usually, it is one phone call or email vs. one call or email per paper.

While utilizing newspaper buying networks may not be feasible for every client, it is an option to consider for clients with larger newspaper buys that are trying to target a number of markets and because of their buying power negotiated rates, it typically is not at any additional costs to your agency.  Win. Win. Win.

Best Uses for Flash (not Gordon)

It’s been impossible to miss the storm of controversy in the tech field over Adobe Flash. By blocking Flash content on the iPhone and iPad, Apple has single-handedly inspired clients and advertisers alike to shy away from an industry standard. Under the barrage of ad campaigns and open letters, it’s easy for a marketer or advertising executive to be left wondering which way to turn, especially when so much of the debate is dominated by developers throwing around highly technical jargon. Ultimately, that decision should come from a thorough analysis of what you’re trying to accomplish and who your audience really is.

When marketers refer to using Flash, they are frequently thinking of it as a video compressor, and this is where some of the most vocal opposition to Flash comes from. The complaint is primarily poor performance in regards to CPU usage, but how accurate is that complaint? Flash performance is based on the plugin’s ability to access hardware acceleration, and Apple is not giving Adobe access to the tools they need to reduce the load.  It’s not difficult to conclude that Apple’s block is more about pushing mobile users to buy videos at their store than it is about doing them a service by blocking video readily available for streaming all over the Internet, but the bottom line is the iPhone won’t use it anytime soon. Is the alternative Apple offers in HTML5 a viable option?

According to YouTube software engineer John Harding, the answer is no. HTML5 falls short in dynamic quality control, buffering, the ability to play full-screen and as uncompiled code and suffers from the ultimate shortcoming: no protection for copyrighted material. It’s also far from being an industry standard. HTML5 has yet to adopt a standard video format, and browser inconsistencies will continue to plague HTML5 for years to come.  Video is not its only downfall either. The “canvas element” for HTML5 has been prematurely lauded as a rival to the interactive aspect of Flash. Since current experiments are crude, only sophisticated browsers support it, and few knowledgeable Flash developers would be willing to give up the wide scope of what they can already accomplish to learn it anytime soon. Flash is by nature a compiled application, something Flash game developers rely on to keep their work protected. HTML5 for games would not only require an excessively lengthy amount of coding to do the same job, it would expose it to the world.

There are alternatives to Flash that can accomplish some of the same purposes with fewer drawbacks and higher cross-platform compatibility. JQuery is quickly becoming a replacement for Flash slideshows because it is commonly supported and does the same job – a simple web effect that can take longer to replicate with Flash in terms of load time and future adjustments. Very few websites are built entirely in Flash anymore and shouldn’t be, not only because of compatibility issues and the time it takes to edit, but also because nothing beats the ease of establishing good relationships with search engines like text that lives outside of a compiled application.

Flash continues to have no reliable competition when it comes to interactive games, activities and animation, as the protection it offers and the breadth of its capabilities have yet to find an equal. Offering this kind of rich media should be something your website does as an enticement to engage, but it should not be a cornerstone of your content. This way, search engines and visitors averse to plugins will still find plenty to explore. Javascript is readily available for your developer to include, and will show alternative content should your visitor arrive without the plugin installed. But what about all of the buzz around mobile devices? Who knows who might be looking at your website and what their capabilities are…shouldn’t you leave Flash out of the mix completely just to be safe?

It’s important to keep your audience in perspective. For the average website, between 75 and 85 percent of visitors are on a PC using Internet Explorer, and in spite of the hype, those visiting on a cell phone or iPad will be less than 1 percent. Consider this: are your friends with iPhones using them to browse business websites or do you more frequently see them using applications developed specifically for their device? While the number of users visiting websites on mobile devices will surely rise, analytic trends from the last five years show that these numbers have hardly budged up to this very week, and any change is likely to be slower than you might think.

Although the direction of Internet development is always bright and exciting, it’s also certain to be a vast hodgepodge of alternate technologies, for nothing in the world of competing browsers has ever been consistent. Keeping a close eye on your analytics will guide the Internet developer to the right tool for the right job, and Flash will continue to be one of those tools for the foreseeable future.

Direct Marketing – and why you shouldn’t discount it.

For many companies it’s a real challenge to decide which advertising medium to use, especially in today’s tech-driven environment. One bad decision could cost a company their entire marketing budget, so how do they decide which medium is right? There’s the Internet, newspapers, magazines, television, radio, social media and more. But for some reason, the channel that most seem to discount these days is direct marketing – and well, that’s just crazy.

With social media on the rise, and being significantly cheaper than other mediums, many companies are going for it. Great if you are opening the hottest new club in town, but what about if you’re trying to sell hearing aids? Twitter may not be your best bet! So, when deciding what channel to use, the first step is to identify your target market and the best way to reach them.

Let’s stick with the hearing aid example. Although an increasing number of seniors own computers and are savvy about navigating them, studies show there are better ways to reach them in a more targeted fashion, like by direct mail.

While Internet spending has increased dramatically over the last several years and newspaper advertising has decreased dramatically, direct mail spending has remained virtually flat. Flat doesn’t sound good, does it? But really, this means that it’s a tried and true marketing medium that has stayed consistent throughout the years.

Direct marketing, as defined by Wikipedia, is a form of advertising that reaches its audience without using traditional, formal channels of advertising, such as TV, newspapers or radio. The goal of direct marketing is to allow businesses to communicate directly to the consumer through the use of advertising techniques such as flier and catalogue distribution, mailing of promotional letters, and street advertising.

There are several advantages to direct marketing. Here are a few:

1. It enables you to send your message directly to the consumer, without interference.  For instance, when it comes to TV spots, how many people now Tivo and DVR their favorite TV shows, and skip right through the commercials, blasphemous to an advertiser, but it happens nonetheless!

2. It also allows you to personalize your message to each consumer. “Dear Mr. Jones, we would like to offer you a special discount…”

3. Direct mail also can include a call to action, which allows for tracking. For example, if you ask consumers to “bring this coupon into the store to receive your discount,” you can actually tally up the amount of coupons the store receives to see the success of your campaign. Other calls to action include, “call this number” or “logon to this website.”

4. Although there are many forms of direct marketing – telemarketing, e-mail marketing, door-to-door leaflet marketing, broadcast marketing – direct mail remains the most popular.

5. In a study conducted by The Direct Marketing Association, it was found that 57% of the campaigns studied employed integrated strategies.  Of those, almost half (47%) launched their campaigns with a direct mail piece.

6. Additionally, although we were using the hearing aid company as an analogy marketing to seniors, direct mail can also be used successfully to market to all age and ethnic groups.

Direct Mail and Coupons

For the first time since the Depression, the Gen Y group and their followers, the Gen Z group, are saving more money than any of their predecessors. Although not a definite, this could be attributed to the rise of coupon usage. Where it used to be taboo to use a coupon (think standing in line behind the blue-haired lady in the grocery store, with her handful of coupons), it is now the norm and almost expected. Don’t want to spend the money for your morning latte? Probably will if you have a 50% off coupon. And what better way to receive a coupon that by having it mailed directly to your house?

So when determining how best to spend your precious marketing dollars, first and foremost consider your market and how to reach them, then make sure your messaging is clear and if using direct marketing – consider making your consumers an offer. And don’t discount direct marketing – it’s how many consumers get discounts and they love that, so you should too.